Tag Archives: music and movement

“Babywearing Dance” little ones event

August is a notoriously slow month because kids in Colorado go back to school so early – August 9th this year! I decided to hold an event more for moms and the really little kids not going to school. Many moms got very excited about the babywearing dance event, but our attendance was really poor. The moms that came had a blast though! They asked for a weekly event. If we can get a following, I would love to do so! Special thanks to Super Jes Schultz for teaching her Lady Gaga routine.

 

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“Pass It On” yoga storytime

Opening – How I explain the rules of yoga storytime: stay on your mat, and keep your hands to yourself.
(Skip to my Lou –  from Jim Gill)
Stomping feet, one and two
Stomping feet, one and two
But if my feet were covered in glue
I’d stick to the glue, my darling.

Clapping hands, one and two
Clapping hands, one and two
But if my hands were covered in glue
I’d stick to the glue, my darling
(hands in Anjali mudra, or prayer position)

Are you Ready for Yoga? 
Are you ready for yoga?
If you’re ready, then stomp your feet
Stomp your feet and make some noise.
Let’s stomp our feet and make some noise
And do it really fast
Then stop. Stretch your feet up, up, up
And down.
Repeat with arms then both. 
Source: Next Generation Yoga at the National Kids Yoga Conference

Song: “The Shimmy” – Kira Willey

Open the Book
Arms, legs, both
Close the book. Open the book. Turn the page.
Start seated with arms stretched out in front of you, palms touching. To “open the book,” stretch the arms wide. To close it, bring them back together. To “turn the page,” open just the right arm and close it, then the left arm and close it. Repeat “turning pages” until the kids giggle. Repeat the whole sequence using legs instead of arms. Then try arms and legs together. 

We talked about letting our hearts shine, about letting ourselves see the beauty in everything around us and being happy.

Book – Shine by Patrick McDonnell
-rainbow – adho mukha svanasana/downward dog OR urdhva dhanurasana/wheel
-octopus – ananda balasana/happy baby
-monkey – Dance around like a monkey. Calm down in gorilla/padahastasana
-whale – salabhasana/locust pose, swim your arms and legs
-roller coaster- seated forward fold/paschimottanasana. Pretend to slowly go up the hill and then forward fold, hands in the air like a roller coaster
-elephant –  prasarita padottanasana, lifting arms like trunk and spraying like elephant on the way down
– tree- vrksasana
– happy moment fill you up – balloon breath

“Orange you Grateful” game from Kidding Around Yoga
Sit in a circle and pass a ball around using only your feet. If  the kids are old enough and/or coordinated enough, have them say something their grateful for every time they have the ball.

 

Savasana 

Peace begins with me
Hold both hands overhead. On the word “peace,” touch the thumbs and pinky fingers together. On the word “begins,” touch the thumbs and ring fingers. On the word “with,” touch the thumbs and middle fingers. On the word “me,” touch the thumbs and pointers. Repeat this four times, the first time loudly and hands overhead. The second time, bring the hands down a little and speak a little softer. The third time, bring hands lower and whisper. The last time, bring hands to knees and speak words silently to self.
Source: Kids Yoga Guide Teacher Training

Flowers to give away to someone you love

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“Fish” yoga storytime

swallow-the-leader

Opening – How I explain the rules of yoga storytime: stay on your mat, and keep your hands to yourself.
(Skip to my Lou –  from Jim Gill)
Stomping feet, one and two
Stomping feet, one and two
But if my feet were covered in glue
I’d stick to the glue, my darling.

Clapping hands, one and two
Clapping hands, one and two
But if my hands were covered in glue
I’d stick to the glue, my darling
(hands in Anjali mudra, or prayer position)

Are you Ready for Yoga? 
Are you ready for yoga?
If you’re ready, then stomp your feet
Stomp your feet and make some noise.
Let’s stomp our feet and make some noise
And do it really fast
Then stop. Stretch your feet up, up, up
And down.
Repeat with arms then both. 
Source: Next Generation Yoga at the National Kids Yoga Conference

Sun Salutations
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I used these sun salutations from Yoga Games for Children as posted by Breathe. Flow. Grow. Yoga. 

Open the Book
Arms, legs, both
Close the book. Open the book. Turn the page.
Start seated with arms stretched out in front of you, palms touching. To “open the book,” stretch the arms wide. To close it, bring them back together. To “turn the page,” open just the right arm and close it, then the left arm and close it. Repeat “turning pages” until the kids giggle. Repeat the whole sequence using legs instead of arms. Then try arms and legs together. 

Book – Swallow the Leader : a Counting Book by Danna Smith
1 fish – fish pose/matsyasana
2 fish – Lie in hollow body or banana. Splash arms and legs.
3 fish – Crab walk.
4 fish – rabbit pose/shasangasana. Rise when you blow like a whale.
5 fishfive pointed star for a ray
6 fish – blowfish – Take deep breaths in and out.
7 fish – shark – locust post, shalabasana with hands in prayer position overhead like a dorsal fin
 8 fish – seahorse – Sit in dandasana. Slowly move your legs to walk, then faster to trot, and faster to gallop. Roll back and then up to seated for “WHOA!” This is similar to “Walkin’ Ol’ Joe.”
9 fishturtle pose
Repeat all the poses as you count back down.
On the burp, roll backwards and try to come to standing on your mat without using your hands.

Toe-ga
I tossed out “fish food” (a bag of pompoms) around the room and had the kids collect the pompoms with their toes and place them into bowls. Normally, this game is called “toe-ga.”

Song: Kidding Around Yoga’s “A Yogi Went to Sea

Hoberman Sphere Breathing Ball

Savasana 

Peace begins with me
Hold both hands overhead. On the word “peace,” touch the thumbs and pinky fingers together. On the word “begins,” touch the thumbs and ring fingers. On the word “with,” touch the thumbs and middle fingers. On the word “me,” touch the thumbs and pointers. Repeat this four times, the first time loudly and hands overhead. The second time, bring the hands down a little and speak a little softer. The third time, bring hands lower and whisper. The last time, bring hands to knees and speak words silently to self.
Source: Kids Yoga Guide Teacher Training

I didn’t offer a craft this time, but I did give each participant a “yoga fish” (fortune teller fish). The fish “bend” into poses!

Namaste!

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“I Got the Rythym” preschool book club

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We started off this session of Story Explorers with a beat bop, bing bang, boom boom boom. I Got the Rhythm by Connie Schofield-Morrison is a CLEL Bell winner in the Every Child Ready to Read 2 category of Singing. I love the music, movement, and multiculturalism in this book.

Let’s Get the Rhythm of our Knees
Let’s get the rhythm of our knees (x3)
If you please
Let’s get the rhythm of our knees
Shoulders… Big boulders..
Heads… Oh dread..
Feet… How neat…
Source: Jbrary

Read I Got the Rhythm.

We then made our own instruments to create our own beat.

We made tambourines out of paper plates like this post.
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We made guitars out of tissue boxes like this.
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We made drums like this post using this free drum printable. The drum sticks are library blueberry-scented pencils.
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We made shakers out of prescription bottles and rice and beans. The kids could hear the difference in sounds between the ones filled with rice and the ones filled with beans. We decorated the bottles with stickers and deco tape.
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I’d say the kids were happy with their stash.
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“Music and Movement” toddler storytime

toddler movement

Opening Rhyme
(to the tune of The Farmer in the Dell)
We’re all here today. We’re all here today.
Let’s clap our hands and sing together.
Hip, hip, hooray!
Source: (To be honest, my library was using this before I started so I’m not sure where the previous librarian found it, but it looks like a modified version of Jean Warren’s Preschool Express song here.)

Open Shut Them
Open, shut them, open, shut them,
Give a little clap, clap, clap.
Open, shut them, open, shut them,
Put them in your lap, lap, lap.
Creep them, crawl them,
Creep them, crawl them,
Right up to your chin, chin, chin.
Open up your little mouth,
But do not put them in.
Source: King County Library System

Song – Jim Gill’s “Can’t Wait to Celebrate

Book – From Head to Toe

A Ram Sam Sam
A ram sam sam
A ram sam sam
Guli guli guli guli guli
Ram sam sam
A rafi, a rafi,
Guli guli guli guli guli
Ram sam sam
Source: Storyblocks

Book – If You’re Happy and You Know It illustrated by Jane Cabrera

 Song – Mr. Eric’s “Shake Shake Minuet in Gwith shaker eggs

Bubbles – best bubble machine ever! (IMHO, of course)

 Rainbows in my Bubbles
Tune of She’ll be Coming Round the Mountain)
I’ve got rainbows in my bubbles, yes, I do
I’ve got rainbows in my bubbles, yes, I do
When I look up towards the sun,
They’ve got rainbows every one.
I’ve got rainbows in my bubbles, yes, I do.
Source: Preschool Express

Good-bye Song
(Tune of Ten Little Indians)
Wave with one hand, then with the other
Wave with one hand, then with the other
Wave with one hand, then with the other
Wave with both feet now
Repeat with other body parts
Source: King County Library System

Play Time!

Early literacy tip:  Melodies divide words into smaller parts and present language in patterns that make sense to the brain example: Alphabet makes no sense until presented in a song where the letters are learned and retained in a pattern. Children already know melodies to nursery rhymes, and can participate in “reading.” (Example: children are more likely to sing Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star than to say the words if simply read from a book.) Songs naturally divide words into syllables and sounds, so they are internalized. The built-in repetition and rhyme increase understanding and retention.
Source: Nationwide Children’s/Nancy Music/ Reach Out and Read

 

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