“Music and Movement” toddler storytime

toddler movement

Opening Rhyme
(to the tune of The Farmer in the Dell)
We’re all here today. We’re all here today.
Let’s clap our hands and sing together.
Hip, hip, hooray!
Source: (To be honest, my library was using this before I started so I’m not sure where the previous librarian found it, but it looks like a modified version of Jean Warren’s Preschool Express song here.)

Open Shut Them
Open, shut them, open, shut them,
Give a little clap, clap, clap.
Open, shut them, open, shut them,
Put them in your lap, lap, lap.
Creep them, crawl them,
Creep them, crawl them,
Right up to your chin, chin, chin.
Open up your little mouth,
But do not put them in.
Source: King County Library System

Song – Jim Gill’s “Can’t Wait to Celebrate

Book – From Head to Toe

A Ram Sam Sam
A ram sam sam
A ram sam sam
Guli guli guli guli guli
Ram sam sam
A rafi, a rafi,
Guli guli guli guli guli
Ram sam sam
Source: Storyblocks

Book – If You’re Happy and You Know It illustrated by Jane Cabrera

 Song – Mr. Eric’s “Shake Shake Minuet in Gwith shaker eggs

Bubbles – best bubble machine ever! (IMHO, of course)

 Rainbows in my Bubbles
Tune of She’ll be Coming Round the Mountain)
I’ve got rainbows in my bubbles, yes, I do
I’ve got rainbows in my bubbles, yes, I do
When I look up towards the sun,
They’ve got rainbows every one.
I’ve got rainbows in my bubbles, yes, I do.
Source: Preschool Express

Good-bye Song
(Tune of Ten Little Indians)
Wave with one hand, then with the other
Wave with one hand, then with the other
Wave with one hand, then with the other
Wave with both feet now
Repeat with other body parts
Source: King County Library System

Play Time!

Early literacy tip:  Melodies divide words into smaller parts and present language in patterns that make sense to the brain example: Alphabet makes no sense until presented in a song where the letters are learned and retained in a pattern. Children already know melodies to nursery rhymes, and can participate in “reading.” (Example: children are more likely to sing Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star than to say the words if simply read from a book.) Songs naturally divide words into syllables and sounds, so they are internalized. The built-in repetition and rhyme increase understanding and retention.
Source: Nationwide Children’s/Nancy Music/ Reach Out and Read

 

Creative Commons License
Yogibrarian is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s