“Banned Books Week” preschool storytime

 

preschool banned books

Opening Song
I wiggle my fingers. I wiggle my toes.
I wiggle my ears. I wiggle my nose.
I wiggle my shoulders. I wiggle my chin.
I stretch my arms wide and pull them back in.
I wiggle my elbows. I wiggle my knees.
I hop like a bunny. I smile and say, “Cheese!”
Now I have no more wiggles left in me
And I sit on the floor as still as can be.
Source: Storytime with Jason

Book – Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

Song: Mr. Eric’s “I Can Shake my Shaker Egg” – Let the wild rumpus start!
The kids actually wanted to do this song again, so we didn’t have time for the next rhyme, but I wanted to throw it on here anyway.

Did You Ever See a Wild Thing?
Did you ever see a wild thing,
A wild thing, a wild thing?
Did you ever see a wild thing
Go this way and that
Go this way and that way
And this way and that way?
Did you ever see a wild thing
Go this way and that
Source: Adapted traditional

 

Book – The Family Book by Todd Parr

If You Love Mom and You Know It
If you love Mom and you know it,
Clap your hands.
If you love Mom and you know it,
Clap your hands.
If you love Mom and you know it,
Then your face will surely show it.
If you love Mom and you know it,
Clap your hands.
Dad…say, “I love you”
Sister…blow a kiss
Brother…give a hug
Source: Adapted traditional

Counting Sheep (sung to “This Old Man”)
Counting sheep, counting sheep
Helps my mommy go to sleep.
(stretch and yawn)
One sheep, two sheep,
(hold up appropriate number of fingers)
Three sheep, four
Soon my mommy starts to snore.
Repeat with “daddy” and other family members
Source: Lansdowne Library CSD

Make a Heart
(make a heart using both hands)
Make a heart up in the sky.
Make it tall. Make it wide.
Make a heart close to the ground.
Make it small, then sit down.
Source: King County Library System

Book – It’s a Book by Lane Smith

Song – “Ziggy Says” – Ziggy Marley

A Ram Sam Sam*
A ram sam sam
A ram sam sam
Guli guli guli guli guli
A rafi, a rafi,
Guli guli guli guli guli
Ram sam sam
Source: Storyblocks

*This song was unofficially challenged at my library when a child care provider didn’t want to sing it unless we could explain what the words meant. The storytime provider didn’t know and referred the patron to me. Truth is, no one knows what the words mean. It’s traditionally called a Moroccan folk song, but it doesn’t mean anything in any language spoken in Morocco either. I told the patron we sing it because it’s fun and because the movements work the midline of the body. Working the midline creates connections between the 2 hemispheres of the brain, which is vital in learning spatial awareness and in learning to read and write.

Goodbye
Bread and butter, marmalade and jam
Let’s say good-bye as high as we can
Good-bye! (in high, squeaky voice)
Bread and butter, marmalade and jam
Let’s say good-bye as low as we can
Good-bye! (in a deep voice)
Bread and butter, marmalade and jam
Let’s say good-bye as fast as we can
Good-bye! (very quick)
Bread and butter, marmalade and jam
Let’s say good-bye as slow as we can
Good-bye! (very slowly and drawn out)
Bread and butter, marmalade and jam
Let’s say good-bye as quiet as we can
Good-bye! (in a whisper)
Bread and butter, marmalade and jam
Let’s say good-bye as loud as we can
GOOD-BYE! (yelling)
Source: Jbrary

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular. Click here for more information on Banned Books Week.

 

Creative Commons License
Yogibrarian is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on ““Banned Books Week” preschool storytime

    1. It’s so fun! The little ones don’t really care about the theme; it’s more for the grown-ups. The kids just like the books we read and the songs we dance to. The adults get a kick out of why the books were challenged, and it spreads awareness to BBW. Win!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s